Oral Biol Res 2018; 42(2): 79-84  https://doi.org/10.21851/obr.42.02.201806.79
Comparison of the perception of public posts between students enrolled in dental college and in graduate school of dentistry
Ja-Won Cho1 and Su-Hyun Shim2*
1Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 31116, Republic of Korea
2Department of Dental Hygiene, Kyungbok University, Namyangju 12051, Republic of Korea
Correspondence to: Su-Hyun Shim
Department of Dental Hygiene, Kyungbok University, 425 Gyeongbokdae-ro Jinjeop-eup Namyangju-si Gyeonggi-do 12051, Republic of Korea
Tel.: +82-31-539-5234, Fax: +82-31-539-5348
E-mail: noblige121@naver.com
Received: January 31, 2018; Revised: April 9, 2018; Accepted: April 26, 2018; Published online: June 30, 2018.
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Abstract
This study was designed to investigate the perception of public posts between students enrolled in dental college and in graduate school of dentistry and to propose the new curriculum and public policy to be more appropriate for the future. Study participants were 397 students in dental college and 160 students in graduate school of dentistry. A self-reported questionnaire to ask about socio-demographic characteristics, career plan and the perception of public posts was conducted for 557 students. The data were analyzed using a chi-square test, frequency analysis, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. There were significant differences in socio-demographic characteristics, major satisfaction, and career plans between the two groups. Although these two groups have different backgrounds, both groups of students were motivated by opportunities to get a specialized job and wanted to contribute to public welfare as healthcare professionals in public posts. Most students (96.2%) agreed that government should set up public posts for dentists. Significantly, students in graduate school of dentistry were more likely to quit their jobs if they had opportunities to fill public posts (48.1%) and most of them (38.5%) ranked administrative positions higher than other types of public posts as a desired job. Additionally, students living in the Korean metropolitan area showed the tendency to work in the Korean metropolitan area after graduation, while those living in other areas wanted to work in areas outside the metropolitan area (P<0.001). Though a more well-designed longitudinal study is needed, this study can be valuable for curriculum development and health policymaking.
Keywords: Dental education, Dental student, Policy, Public health


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